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© Digitised Sky Survey (DSS); Second Palomar Observatory Sky Survey (POSS-II)

M81 is well placed

Wed, 19 Feb 2014 at16:56 MST(58 days ago)
23:56 UTC

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Bode's galaxy (M81, NGC 3031) in Ursa Major will be well placed for observation, culminating at around midnight local time.

At magnitude 7.9, M81 is quite faint, and certainly not visible to the naked eye, but can be viewed through a pair of binoculars or small telescope.

At a declination of +69°04' , it is seen to best advantage in the northern hemisphere; in fact, it is unobservable from latitudes much south of 0°S.

The precise position of M81 is as follows:

Object Right Ascension Declination Constellation Magnitude Angular Size
M81 09h55m36s +69°04'00" Ursa Major 7.9 27'00"0

The coordinates above are given in J2000.0.

The sky on 19 February 2014
Sunrise: 07:21
Sunset: 18:12
Twilight from 05:50
until 19:43

20-day old moon
Age of Moon:
20 days

RiseCulm.Set
Mercury06:4212:1017:37
Venus04:4909:5615:04
Moon23:1803:5209:26
Mars22:4004:1909:56
Jupiter14:0421:2004:40
Saturn00:5206:0111:10

Source

The circumstances of this event were computed from the DE405 ephemeris published by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL).

The position of M81 was taken from the NGC2000.0 catalogue.

Image credit
© Digitised Sky Survey (DSS); Second Palomar Observatory Sky Survey (POSS-II)