The Constellation Perseus

by Dominic Ford
Perseus Perseus
The constellation Perseus. Roll mouse over to see labels.
Source: Stellarium.

Perseus is a northern constellation which appears highest in the evening sky in the months around November.

It is prominent from dark sites, having 16 stars of fourth magnitude or brighter. However, only two of these are prominent from light-polluted locations: Mirfak and Algol.

Perseus is perhaps best known for the Perseid meteor shower, one of the best annual meteor showers, whose radiant lies close to η-Per.

The Milky Way also passes through this area of the sky, where it forms a particularly broad band of deep sky objects, including over a dozen bright open clusters.

Among these, the most celebrated are NGC 884 and NGC 869, known as the double cluster.

In Greek mythology, Perseus was the husband of Andromeda, who is represented beside him on the sky. Among Perseus' many heroic exploits, he rescued Andromeda from a sea monster (possibly represented by Cetus) and slew the Gorgon Medusa, from whose body sprang the winged horse Pegasus.

Date First Appeared
Ancient
Sky Area
1.5% of the sky
615.0 square degrees
Messier Objects
Perseus contains the following Messier objects: M34, M76.
Caldwell Objects
Perseus contains the following Caldwell objects: C14, C24.
Neighbors
The following constellations neighbor Perseus: Andromeda, Aries, Auriga, Camelopardalis, Cassiopeia, Taurus, Triangulum.
Please wait
Loading 0/4
Click and drag to rotate
Mouse wheel to zoom in/out
Touch with mouse to dismiss

Brightest Objects in Perseus

Stars Open Clusters Globular Clusters Galaxies
Stars Open Clusters Globular Clusters Galaxies
Mirfak (mag 1.8) NGC 869 (mag 4.0) NGC 1023 (mag 9.5)
Algol (mag 2.1) NGC 884 (mag 4.0) NGC 1003 (mag 11.5)
ζ-Per (mag 2.8) Messier 34 (mag 5.2) NGC 1058 (mag 11.5)
ε-Per (mag 2.9) NGC 1545 (mag 6.2) NGC 1275 (mag 11.6)
γ-Per (mag 2.9) NGC 1528 (mag 6.4) NGC 1169 (mag 11.7)
δ-Per (mag 3.0) NGC 1444 (mag 6.6) NGC 1167 (mag 12.3)
ρ-Per (mag 3.4) NGC 1342 (mag 6.7) NGC 1278 (mag 12.6)
η-Per (mag 3.8) NGC 1582 (mag 7.0) NGC 1175 (mag 12.8)
ν-Per (mag 3.8) IC 348 (mag 7.3) NGC 1273 (mag 12.9)
κ-Per (mag 3.8) NGC 957 (mag 7.6) NGC 1270 (mag 12.9)
Atik (mag 3.9) NGC 744 (mag 7.9) NGC 1130 (mag 13.0)
τ-Per (mag 3.9) NGC 1513 (mag 8.4) NGC 1171 (mag 13.0)
MX Per (mag 4.0) NGC 1245 (mag 8.4) NGC 1186 (mag 13.0)
φ-Per (mag 4.0) NGC 1496 (mag 10.0) NGC 1050 (mag 13.0)
Menkib (mag 4.0) NGC 1605 (mag 10.7) NGC 1122 (mag 13.0)
ι-Per (mag 4.0) NGC 1220 (mag 12.0) NGC 1160 (mag 13.0)
θ-Per (mag 4.1) NGC 1193 (mag 13.0) NGC 1086 (mag 13.0)
μ-Per (mag 4.1) NGC 1548 NGC 1161 (mag 13.0)
16-Per (mag 4.2) IC 288 NGC 1207 (mag 13.0)
e-Per (mag 4.2) IC 1872 IC 284 (mag 13.0)
λ-Per (mag 4.3) NGC 1348 NGC 1106 (mag 13.0)
ψ-Per (mag 4.3) NGC 1294 (mag 13.1)
σ-Per (mag 4.3) NGC 1233 (mag 13.2)
17-Per (mag 4.6) NGC 1277 (mag 13.5)
b Per (mag 4.6) NGC 1281 (mag 13.5)

Ashburn

Latitude:
Longitude:
Timezone:

39.04°N
77.49°W
EDT

Color scheme