List of the Constellations

Constellation Mythological Association First Appeared Genitive Form Brightest Star
Constellation Mythological Association First Appeared Genitive Form Brightest Star
Andromeda
The Princess Andromeda; in Greek mythology, the daughter of Cepheus and Cassiopeia and husband of Perseus.
Ancient
Andromedae Alpheratz
Antlia
The air pump; a southern constellation introduced by Lacaille in 1756, originally the 'pneumatic machine'.
1756 (Lacaille)
Antliae α-Ant
Apus
The bird of paradise; a southern constellation introduced by Keyser & de Houtman in 1598.
1598 (Keyser & de Houtman)
Apodis α-Aps
Aquarius
The water bearer; in Greek mythology, Ganymede, wine-waiter to the Gods and lover of Zeus.
Ancient
Aquarii Sadalsuud
Aquila
The eagle; in Greek mythology, the bird of Zeus and the retriever of his thunderbolts.
Ancient
Aquilae Altair
Ara
The altar; in Greek mythology, used by the Gods to vow allegiance before their battle with the Titans.
Ancient
Arae α-Ara
Aries
The ram; in Greek mythology, the animal whose golden fleece was recovered by Jason and the Argonauts.
Ancient
Arietis Hamal
Auriga
The charioteer; in Greek mythology, Erichthonius, son of Vulcan, the first person to attach four horses to a chariot.
Ancient
Aurigae Capella
Bootes
The herdsman; in Greek mythology, Arcas, son of Zeus by Callisto.
Ancient
Bootis Arcturus
Caelum
The chisel; a southern constellation introduced by Lacaille in 1756.
1756 (Lacaille)
Caeli α-Cae
Camelopardalis
The giraffe; a large but faint northern constellation introduced by Plancius in 1612.
1612 (Plancius)
Camelopardalis β-Cam
Cancer
The crab; in Greek mythology, a crab which bit Hercules's foot.
Ancient
Cancri β-Cnc
Canes Venatici
The hunting dogs; introduced by Johannes Hevelius in 1687, and said to be held by the herdsman Bootes.
1687 (Hevelius)
Canum Venaticorum Cor-Caroli
Canis Major
The greater dog; in Greek mythology, a hunting dog belonging to Orion, depicted pursuing the hare Lepus.
Ancient
Canis Majoris Sirius
Canis Minor
The lesser dog; in Greek mythology, a hunting dog belonging to Orion, depicted pursuing the hare Lepus.
Ancient
Canis Minoris Procyon
Capricornus
The sea goat; associated with Pan in Greek mythology, god of the countryside.
Ancient
Capricorni δ-Cap
Carina
The keel; a sub-division of the ancient constellation Argo – in Greek mythology, the ship of the Argonauts.
1756 (Lacaille)
Carinae Canopus
Cassiopeia
Queen Cassiopeia; in Greek mythology, wife of Cepheus and mother of Andromeda.
Ancient
Cassiopeiae γ-Cas
Centaurus
The Centaur: half man and half horse; in Greek mythology, the wise centaur Chiron.
Ancient
Centauri Rigil-Kentaurus
Cepheus
King Cepheus of Ethiopeia; in Greek mythology, the king of Ethiopia, descended from Zeus and Io.
Ancient
Cephei Alderamin
Cetus
The sea monster, which in Greek mythology attacked Cepheus's territory and Andromeda, but which was slain by Perseus.
Ancient
Ceti Diphda
Chamaeleon
The chameleon; introduced by Keyser & de Houtman in 1598.
1598 (Keyser & de Houtman)
Chamaeleontis α-Cha
Circinus
The pair of dividing compasses; a modern constellation introduced by Lacaille in 1756.
1756 (Lacaille)
Circini α-Cir
Columba
The dove; introduced by Plancius in 1592. In Biblical history, said to be the dove of Noah.
1592 (Plancius)
Columbae Phact
Coma Berenices
The hair of Queen Berenice of Egypt; introduced as a constellation by Vopel in 1536.
1536 (Vopel)
Comae Berenices β-Com
Corona Australis
The southern crown, lying at the feet of Sagittarius, and known to the Greeks as a wreath.
Ancient
Coronae Australis α-CrA
Corona Borealis
The northern crown; in Greek mythology, worn by the Princess Ariadne on her wedding day.
Ancient
Coronae Borealis Alphecca
Corvus
The crow; in Greek mythology, sent by Apollo in search of water.
Ancient
Corvi Gienah
Crater
The cup; in Greek mythology, clutched by the crow Crater in its search for water.
Ancient
Crateris δ-Crt
Crux
The southern cross; introduced as a constellation by Plancius in 1598.
1598 (Plancius)
Crucis Acrux
Cygnus
The swan; in Greek mythology, Zeus in disguise.
Ancient
Cygni Deneb
Delphinus
The dolphin; in Greek mythology, the messenger of Poseidon.
Ancient
Delphini Rotanev
Dorado
The goldfish; a constellation introduced by Keyser & de Houtman in 1598.
1598 (Keyser & de Houtman)
Doradus α-Dor
Draco
The dragon; in Greek mythology, Ladon, guard of the tree on which golden apples grew, slain by Hercules.
Ancient
Draconis Eltanin
Equuleus
The little horse; a tiny yet ancient constellation with no mythological association.
Ancient (Ptolemy)
Equulei Kitalpha
Eridanus
The mythical river Eridanus; associated variously with the Nile or Po.
Ancient
Eridani Achernar
Fornax
The furnace; originally a chemist's distillation furnace, introduced by Lacaille in 1756.
1756 (Lacaille)
Fornacis α-For
Gemini
The mythical twins Castor and Pollux.
Ancient
Geminorum Pollux
Grus
The crane; a constellation introduced by Keyser & de Houtman in 1598.
1598 (Keyser & de Houtman)
Gruis Alnair
Hercules
Hercules; a large yet dark constellation representing the greatest hero of Greek mythology.
Ancient
Herculis Kornephoros
Horologium
The pendulum clock; a modern constellation introduced by Lacaille in 1756.
1756 (Lacaille)
Horologii α-Hor
Hydra
The multi-headed water snake, slain by Hercules in Greek mythology.
Ancient
Hydrae Alphard
Hydrus
The lesser water snake; introduced as a constellation by Keyser & de Houtman in 1598.
1598 (Keyser & de Houtman)
Hydri β-Hyi
Indus
The Indian; introduced as a constellation by Keyser & de Houtman in 1598.
1598 (Keyser & de Houtman)
Indi α-Ind
Lacerta
The lizard; introduced as a constellation by Johannes Hevelius in 1690.
1690 (Hevelius)
Lacertae α-Lac
Leo
The lion of Nemea; in Greek mythology, a monster slain by Hercules.
Ancient
Leonis Regulus
Leo Minor
The lion cub; introduced as a constellation by Johannes Hevelius in 1687.
1687 (Hevelius)
Leonis Minoris 46-LMi
Lepus
The hare; often depicted being chased by Orion and his two dogs.
Ancient
Leporis Arneb
Libra
The balance; a zodiacal constellation introduced by the Romans.
Ancient (Roman)
Librae Zubeneschamali
Lupus
The wolf; an ancient constellation, but without mythological association.
Ancient
Lupi α-Lup
Lynx
The lynx; a faint constellation introduced by Johannes Hevelius in 1687.
1687 (Hevelius)
Lyncis α-Lyn
Lyra
The lyre; often said to be played by Orpheus, the greatest musician of his age.
Ancient
Lyrae Vega
Mensa
Table Mountain, South Africa; a modern constellation introduced by Lacaille in 1756, celebrating his southern-hemisphere observing site.
1756 (Lacaille)
Mensae α-Men
Microscopium
The microscope; a modern constellation introduced by Lacaille in 1756.
1756 (Lacaille)
Microscopii γ-Mic
Monoceros
The unicorn; a constellation introduced by Plancius in 1612.
1612 (Plancius)
Monocerotis α-Mon
Musca
The fly; a constellation introduced by Keyser & de Houtman in 1598.
1598 (Keyser & de Houtman)
Muscae α-Mus
Norma
The set square; a modern constellation introduced by Lacaille in 1756.
1756 (Lacaille)
Normae γ²-Nor
Octans
The octant, a navigational instrument invented in the 1730s. A modern constellation introduced by Lacaille in 1756.
1756 (Lacaille)
Octantis ν-Oct
Ophiuchus
The serpent bearer; in Greek mythology, Asclepius, the god of medicine, depicted in the sky holding the snake Serpens.
Ancient
Ophiuchi Rasalhague
Orion
The hunter; associated in Greek mythology with a son of Poseidon, but associated by the Sumerians with their great hero Gilgamesh.
Ancient
Orionis Rigel
Pavo
The peacock; a constellation introduced by Keyser & de Houtman in 1598.
1598 (Keyser & de Houtman)
Pavonis Peacock
Pegasus
The winged horse; in Greek mythology, used by Zeus to carry thunder and lightning.
Ancient
Pegasi Enif
Perseus
Perseus; in Greek mythology, the husband of Andromeda, also known for slaying Medusa the Gorgon.
Ancient
Persei Mirfak
Phoenix
The phoenix; a constellation introduced by Keyser & de Houtman in 1598.
1598 (Keyser & de Houtman)
Phoenicis Ankaa
Pictor
The painter's easel; a modern constellation introduced by Lacaille in 1756.
1756 (Lacaille)
Pictoris α-Pic
Pisces
Two fishes, swimming in opposite directions with their tails connected by a cord.
Ancient
Piscium η-Psc
Piscis Austrinus
The southern fish; the parent of the two fish depicted by Pisces.
Ancient
Piscis Austrini Fomalhaut
Puppis
The poop deck of the Argo Navis; a sub-division of the ancient constellation Argo – in Greek mythology, the ship of the Argonauts.
1756 (Lacaille)
Puppis Naos
Pyxis
The compass; a southern constellation introduced by Lacaille in 1756.
1756 (Lacaille)
Pyxidis α-Pyx
Reticulum
The net; a southern constellation introduced by Lacaille in 1756, commemorating the cross-hair in his telescope.
1756 (Lacaille)
Reticuli α-Ret
Sagitta
The arrow; in Greek mythology, perhaps the arrow that Apollo used to kill the Cyclopes.
Ancient
Sagittae γ-Sge
Sagittarius
The archer; usually drawn as a centaur – half man, half horse
Ancient
Sagittarii Kaus-Australis
Scorpius
The scorpion; said to have stung the hunter Orion to death in Greek mythology.
Ancient
Scorpii Antares
Sculptor
The sculptor – originally, the sculptor's studio; a modern constellation introduced by Lacaille in 1756.
1756 (Lacaille)
Sculptoris α-Scl
Scutum
The shield; a constellation honouring King John III Sobieski of Poland – the only politically inspired constellation still in use.
1684 (Hevelius)
Scuti α-Sct
Serpens Caput
The serpent's head; held by Ophiuchus and part of the same constellation as Serpens Cauda.
Ancient
Serpentis Caput Unukalhai
Serpens Cauda
The serpent's tail; held by Ophiuchus and part of the same constellation as Serpens Caput.
Ancient
Serpentis Cauda η-Ser
Sextans
The sextant; a constellation introduced by Johannes Hevelius in 1687, celebrating an instrument used to measure star positions.
1687 (Hevelius)
Sextantis α-Sex
Taurus
The bull; said by the Sumerians to be charging at Orion the hunter, but in Greek mythology said to be Zeus in disguise.
Ancient
Tauri Aldebaran
Telescopium
The telescope; a modern constellation introduced by Lacaille in 1756.
1756 (Lacaille)
Telescopii α-Tel
Triangulum
The triangle; appearing similar to a capital delta in the Greek alphabet.
Ancient
Trianguli β-Tri
Triangulum Australe
The southern triangle; a constellation introduced by Keyser & de Houtman in 1598.
1598 (Keyser & de Houtman)
Trianguli Australe Atria
Tucana
The toucan; a constellation introduced by Keyser & de Houtman in 1598.
1598 (Keyser & de Houtman)
Tucanae α-Tuc
Ursa Major
The great bear, also known as the Big Dipper or the Plough. In Greek mythology, Callisto, lover of Zeus.
Ancient
Ursae Majoris Alioth
Ursa Minor
The lesser bear; in Greek mythology, one of the nymphs that nursed Zeus as an infant.
Ancient
Ursae Minoris Polaris
Vela
The sail; a sub-division of the ancient constellation Argo – in Greek mythology, the ship of the Argonauts.
1756 (Lacaille)
Velorum γ²-Vel
Virgo
The virgin; in Greek mythology, the goddess of justice.
Ancient
Virginis Spica
Volans
The flying fish; a constellation introduced by Keyser & de Houtman in 1598, celebrating the family Exocoetidae.
1598 (Keyser & de Houtman)
Volantis γ²-Vol
Vulpecula
The fox; a constellation introduced by Johannes Hevelius in 1687.
1687 (Hevelius)
Vulpeculae α-Vul

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Longitude:
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39.04°N
77.49°W
EST

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